Royal Canadian Mint

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BOREAL BALSAM POPLAR Forest Of Canada Silver Coin 20$ Canada 2015


Fourth issue in this exciting series that explores the diversity and beauty of Canada’s forests. A stunning visual essay on Canadian flora! An original gift for nature lovers and tree-appreciators across Canada from coast to coast who are proud of the great Boreal forest that defines their nation by braving the harsh environment of the North.

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Boreal Balsam Poplar
Populus balsamifera, commonly called balsam poplar, bam, bamtree, eastern balsam poplar, hackmatack, tacamahac poplar tacamahaca, is a tree species in the balsam poplar species group in the poplar genus, Populus. The genus name Populus is from the Latin for poplar, and the specific epithet balsamifera from Latin for "balsam-bearing". Other common names for the species include heartleaf balsam poplar, and Ontario balsam poplar. The black cottonwood, Populus trichocarpa, is sometimes considered a subspecies of P. balsamifera and may lend its common name to this species, although the black poplars and cottonwoods of Populus sect. Aigeiros are not closely related.
Populus balsamifera is the northernmost American hardwood, growing transcontinentally on boreal and montane upland and flood plain sites, and attaining its best development on flood plains. It is a hardy, fast-growing tree which is generally short lived, but some trees as old as 200 years have been found.

  • CountryCanada
  • Year2015
  • Face Value20 Dollars
  • MetalSilver
  • Fineness (purity)999/1000
  • Weight (g)31.39
  • Diameter (mm)38
  • QualityProof
  • Mintage (pcs)8.500
  • Certificate (COA)Yes
  • Presentation case (box)Yes

The reverse design by Canadian artist Margaret Best features the mountainous western reach of the boreal forest with a Balsam Poplar in the foreground growing in its preferred habitat—an open space near water. Only a single branch is visible in this design, and it is beautifully crafted in colour to highlight the textural qualities of the tree’s bark, its emerging springtime buds and the delicate colouration of its red catkins. These drooping, cylinder-shaped flower clusters are designed for cross-pollination. Male flowers are red while female flowers are yellow, much larger, and grow on separate trees.