Oceania South Pacific

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LINDEN LEAF 3D Gold Leaf Collection 1 Oz Silver Coin 10$ Samoa 2015


A numismatic masterpiece, made of 1 oz of pure silver 999, this issue of a new series "Gold Leaf Collection" features a real three dimensional linden gold leaf. The size of the leaf is approximately 30 x 25 mm and made from hammered gold. The coin is housed in an elegant wooden box. Extremely limited mintage of only 2500 pcs worldwide!

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Linden Leaf
Tilia is a genus of about 30 species of trees native throughout most of the temperate Northern Hemisphere. Commonly called lime trees in the British Isles, they are not closely related to the lime fruit. Other names include linden and basswood. The genus occurs in Europe and eastern North America, but the greatest species diversity is found in Asia. Under the Cronquist classification system, this genus was placed in the family Tiliaceae, but genetic research summarized by the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group has resulted in the incorporation of this genus into the Malvaceae.
Tilia species are mostly large, deciduous trees, reaching typically 20 to 40 metres (66 to 130 ft) tall, with oblique-cordate leaves 6 to 20 centimetres (2 to 8 in) across. As with elms, the exact number of species is uncertain, as many if not most of the species will hybridise readily, both in the wild and in cultivation. Limes are hermaphroditic, having perfect flowers with both male and female parts, pollinated by insects. The Tilia sturdy trunk stands like a pillar and the branches divide and subdivide into numerous ramifications on which the twigs are fine and thick. In summer, these are profusely clothed with large leaves and the result is a dense head of abundant foliage. The leaves of all the Tilia species are heart-shaped and most are asymmetrical, and the tiny fruit, looking like peas, always hang attached to a ribbon-like, greenish-yellow bract, whose use seems to be to launch the ripened seed-clusters just a little beyond the parent tree. The flowers of the European and American Tilia species are similar, except the American bears a petal-like scale among its stamens and the European varieties are devoid of these appendages. All of the Tilia species may be propagated by cuttings and grafting, as well as by seed. They grow rapidly in rich soil, but are subject to the attack of many insects. Tilia is notoriously difficult to propagate from seed unless collected fresh in the fall. If allowed to dry, the seeds will go into a deep dormancy and take 18 months to germinate.
In particular, aphids are attracted by the rich supply of sap, and are in turn often "farmed" by ants for the production of the sap which the ants collect for their own use, and the result can often be a dripping of excess sap onto the lower branches and leaves, and anything else below. Cars left under the trees can quickly become coated with a film of the syrup ("honeydew") thus dropped from higher up. The ant/aphid "farming" process does not appear to cause any serious damage to the trees.

  • CountrySamoa
  • Year2015
  • Face Value10 Dollars
  • MetalSilver, Gold
  • Fineness (purity)999/1000
  • Weight (g)31.1 (1 oz)
  • Diameter (mm)40
  • QualityProof
  • Mintage (pcs)2.500
  • Certificate (COA)Yes
  • Presentation case (box)Yes

The coin's reverse features one gold linden leaf in 3D laid on the coin with the serie's name "The Gold Leaf Collection", the issue date and the silver fineness.
The coin's obverse depicts the coat of arms of Samoa and the face value.