LEAFY DRAGON Fish Australian Sea Life Moneda Plata 50c Australia 2009

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The second release from the five coin series, Australian Sea Life Series, marks the Leafy Sea Dragon struck of 99.9% pure silver in proof quality, the coin is issued as legal tender under the authority of the Government of Australia.

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79.95 €

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Específicas
País Australia
Año 2009
Valor Facial 50 Cents
Metal Plata
Finura 999/1000
Peso (g) 15.57 (1/2 oz)
Diámetro (mm) 35
Calidad Proof
Tirada (uds) 10.000
Certificado de Autenticidad
Caja
 
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LEAFY SEA DRAGON
Sea Dragons are arguably the most spectacular and mysterious of all ocean fish. Though close relatives of sea horses, sea dragons have larger bodies and leaf-like appendages which enable them to hide among floating seaweed or kelp beds. Sea dragons feed on larval fishes and amphipods, such as and small shrimp-like crustaceans called mysids ("sea lice"), sucking up their prey in their small mouths. Many of these amphipods feed on the red algae that thrives in the shade of the kelp forests where the sea dragons live.
As with their smaller common seahorse (and pipefish) cousins, the male sea dragon carries and incubates the eggs until they hatch. During mating the female deposits up to 250 eggs onto the "brood patch" on the underside of the male's tail. After about eight weeks, the brood hatches, but in nature only about 5 per cent of sea dragons survive to maturity (two years). A fully grown Leafy Sea Dragon grows to about 18 inches (45 cm).
Leafy Sea Dragons are very interesting to watch-- the leafy appendages are not used for movement. The body of a sea dragon scarcely appears to move at all. Steering and turning is through movement of tiny, translucent fins along the sides of the head (pectoral fins, visible above) and propulsion derives from the dorsal fins (along the spine). Their movement is as though an invisible hand were helping, causing them to glide and tumble in peculiar but graceful patterns in slow-motion. This movement appears to mimic the swaying movements of the seaweed and kelp. Only close observation reveals movement of an eye or tiny fins.
Most sources of information about sea dragons say they are found in the ocean waters of southern Western Australia, South Australia and further east along the coastline of Victoria province, Australia. Sea dragons are protected under Australian law, and their export is strictly regulated. A 1996 assessment by the Australian government's Department of Environmental Heritage indicates "It [the Leafy Sea Dragon] is now completely protected in South Australia because demand for aquarium specimens threatened the species with extinction.

Australian waters host some of the most famous reef systems in the world. From spectacular tropical corals to towering forests of kelp, these dynamic environments are teeming with aquatic life.
Celebrating the extraordinary array of creatures supported by Australia’s diverse marine habitats, this new silver coin series depicts five fascinating reef dwellers, commencing with the Lionfish.
Scheduled for individual release between September 2009 and May 2010, each coin is struck by The Perth Mint from 1/2oz of 99.9% pure silver in proof quality.

All coins in the series:

  • 2009 Lionfish
  • 2009 Leafy Sea Dragon
  • 2010 Clownfish
  • 2010 Seahorse
  • 2010 Moray Eel

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