PHEIDIPPIDIS MARATHON Run High Relief Moneda Plata 1$ Tuvalu 2010

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This year marks the 2,500th anniversary of Pheidippidis’ 25-mile run to Athens with news of the Greek army’s historic triumph at the Battle of Marathon. His remarkable long-distance achievement inspired the introduction of Olympic marathon running in 1896, and has also influenced countless ordinary joggers to attempt the gruelling 26.22 miles at one of today’s many high-profile marathon events.

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Específicas
País Tuvalu
Año 2010
Valor Facial 1 Dólar
Metal Plata
Finura 999/1000
Peso (g) 31.1 (1 oz)
Diámetro (mm) 32.6
Calidad Proof
Tirada (uds) 5.000
Certificado de Autenticidad
Caja
 
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PHEIDIPPIDES
Pheidippides (sometimes given as Phidippides or Philippides), hero of Ancient Greece, is the central figure in a story which was the inspiration for a modern sporting event, the marathon.
The traditional story relates that Pheidippides (530 BC–490 BC), an Athenian herald, was sent to Sparta to request help when the Persians landed at Marathon, Greece.
He ran 240 km (150 miles) in two days. He then ran the 40 km (25 miles) from the battlefield near the town of Marathon to Athens to announce the Greek victory over Persia in the Battle of Marathon (490 BC) with the word "Nenikékamen" ('We have won') and collapsed and died on the spot because of exhaustion.
Most accounts incorrectly attribute this story to the historian Herodotus, who wrote the history of the Persian Wars in his Histories (composed about 440 BC). In reality, the traditional story appears to be a conflation from several different ancient Greek sources having varying levels of authenticity.

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